Unstepping the mast in Tonawada (Unstepping?)

I’ll start with unstepping the mast.  Unstepping the mast means taking the mast off the mounts on the boat.  For us that is major because the mast goes through the  cabin roof all the way to the keel of the boat (or bottom of the boat).   “Adventure has to have her mast unstepped in order to travel down the Erie Canal.  With the mast up we are 52′ from the water line to the top of the mast.  A problem on the Erie canal because the bridge clearance is only 15′.

We met with Rob and Geoff to plan the unstepping of our mast.  They wanted us to move over to the hoist so they could lift it straight up and lay it down.  We we need horses, think large saw horses used in shops, to lay the mast down and tie it to “Adventure”.

Moving “Adventure” to the hoist became an issue trying to get her out of the slip.  While backing out Wahyne from another boat helping dropped the line in the water and it went through the prop and stopped the engine.  Tom and William can remember that happening one other time.  I grabbed a knife and cut the line.  Fortunately the engine started and the prop would work.  So we got it around to the hoist location on the marina.

We also met George who was going to look at our instrument gauges and get them working.

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George the engine instrument man.

He started working on the instruments right away.  Trying to get everything to match became a problem so he was busy.  The decision to use our new alternator came into play when the old alternator did not have the tachometer lead.

Then Rob told us we would have to build horses for the mast and Mike would come over and measure for them the next morning.  So the unstepping would not happen until the next day.  But he said we could remove all the Stays and shroud cables.  (The wires going to the mast that supports it.  We would also remove and fold the Main Sail and the Genoa Sail.  That kept us busy for the balance of the day.  (My best excuse for getting behind on the blog.

The following morning Mike showed up at 10 AM and measured for the horses.

We continued getting everything set to unstep the mast.they showed up with the horses and we started the unstepping process.  It was imortant to us to work quickly as there were 3 of them and they charged $105 per hour.  So I’ll stop writing and show you the pictures Tam took.

Installing the forward horse

Installing the forward horse

Installing the aft horse.

Installing the aft horse.

If you have used a nail gun Mike went wild nailing the horses together with a nail gun.

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The Travel Lift and attaching it to the mast getting ready to pull it out.

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Pulling the mast out then swinging it up onto the horses.  A lot of horsepower.

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Rob putting the mast unto the aft horse

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The mast laying down.  Poor “Adventure”.  IMG_3618

Geoff and I talking about the plan to put the Dinghy on the deck as well.

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The Dinghy is deflated and on top of the cabn

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The mast tied down (Duct Taped mostly) and ready to leave.

This is the actual transcript of a radio conversation between a British Navy ship and the Irish Coastguard, off the coast of Kerry:

Irish. Please divert your course 15 degrees to the south, to avoid collision

British. Recommend you divert your course 15 degrees to the north, to avoid collision

Irish. Negative. You will have to divert your course 15 degrees to the south ‘ to avoid collision.

British. This is the Captain of a British Navy Ship. I say again, divert YOUR course.

Irish. Negative. I say again, you will have to divert YOUR course

British. THIS IS THE LARGEST SHIP IN THE BRITISH FLEET. WE ARE ACCOMPANIED BY 3 DESTROYERS, 3 CRUISERS, AND NUMEROUS SUPPORT SHIPS. I DEMAND THAT YOU CHANGE YOUR COURSE 15 DEGREES TO THE NORTH, OR COUNTERMEASURES WILL BE UNDERTAKEN TO ENSURE THE SAFETY OF THIS FLOTILLA.

Irish. THIS IS A LIGHTHOUSE ……. YOUR CALL!

Headed to the Erie

“Live Your Dreams”

At 2 PM

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